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Andrew Wedeman

Andrew Wedeman
Professor
Department of Political Science
Georgia State University
P.O. Box 4069
Atlanta, Georgia 30302-4069
Phone: 404.413. 6154
Fax: 404.413.6156
Email: awedeman@gsu.edu

Expertise: China’s Political Economy and Corruption

Andrew Wedeman received his doctorate in Political Science from the University of California, Los Angeles in 1994 and is a Professor of Political Science at Georgia State University. Prior to this appointment, he spent eighteen years with the Department of Political Science at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL), where he also served as the Director of the Asian Studies Program and the Director of the UNL International Studies Program. In addition he has held posts a visiting research professor at Beijing University, a Visiting Associate Professor of Political Science at the Johns Hopkins Nanjing University Center for Sino-American Studies and a Fulbright Research Professorship at Taiwan National University during 2001-2. His publications include Double Paradox: Rapid Growth and Rising Corruption in China (Cornell); From Mao to Market: Rent Seeking, Local Protectionism, and Marketization in China (Cambridge); articles in a academic journals including China Quarterly, Journal of Contemporary China; and China Review; and chapters in numerous edited volumes. Professor Wedeman is now beginning a new book project examining social unrest in China.

Book Publications

Book Publisher Date Purchase
The Double Paradox of Rapid Growth and Rising Corruption in China Cornell University Press 2012 The Double Paradox of Rapid Growth and Rising Corruption in China
From Mao to Market: Rent Seeking, Local Protestionism, and Marketization in China Cambridge University Press 2003 From Mao to Market: Rent Seeking, Local Protestionism, and Marketization in China