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Jan
31
Wed
Roundtable Discussion: Is China an Adversary to the U.S.? @ Emory University Goizueta Business School, Room W525
Jan 31 @ 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
Roundtable Discussion: Is China an Adversary to the U.S.? @ Emory University Goizueta Business School, Room W525 | Atlanta | Georgia | United States

A Conversation on the 2018 National Security Strategy of the United States of America

Moderated by Robert A. Kapp, The Carter Center

Discussants: Robert Daly, Zhu Feng, David Firestein, Ding Gang and Hu Xijin

Six well-known Chinese and American opinion makers will engage each other in a debate on whether the US and China are adversaries and what can be done to reduce misperception and hostility between Washington and Beijing. Many say this relationship is too big to fail; others say it is too big and complex to manage. We will see what these scholars say about this most consequential relationship in the 21st century.

Feb
12
Mon
Maggie Wedeman: Studying China and Chinese @ 350 Dahlberg Hall, Georgia State University
Feb 12 @ 11:30 am – 1:00 pm

Maggie Wedeman, Schwarzman Fellow, National Committee on U.S.-China Relations, New York City, will present on her experiences studying China and Chinese, and now working with the National Committee.

Join Maggie for her presentation, a discussion and an opportunity to meet other students.  Lunch will be provided.

Maggie Headshot Forweb

Maggie is currently a fellow with the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations.  She is a recent graduate from the first cohort of students from the Schwarzman College at Tsinghua University in Beijing.  She first visited China when she was 18 months old and spent many years in grade school living in Nanjing and Taipei with her family. As an undergraduate at the George Washington University, she double majored in Chinese language and international affairs, with a concentration in security policy and the Asia region. Under the mentorship of David Shambaugh, Maggie developed a research method to analyze Chinese perspectives on non-traditional security issues such as terrorism, energy security, climate change, and public health concerns.

While at Schwarzman College, Maggie served on the leadership team that hosted the International Women’s Day conference at the college. She also helped facilitate a symposium with 25 Rhodes Scholars that aimed to deepen their understanding of China. Maggie has a deep commitment to learning about China and a determination to create opportunities for her peers to exchange ideas.

Event Flier:GPS Flyer Maggie Wedeman February 2018

 

 

Feb
13
Tue
Maggie Wedeman: Studying China & Chinese @ White Hall Rm 111, Emory University
Feb 13 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm

Maggie Wedeman, Schwarzman Fellow, National Committee on U.S.-China Relations, New York City.

Join Maggie for her presentation, a discussion and an opportunity to meet other students.  Lunch will be provided.

Maggie Headshot Forweb

Maggie is currently a fellow with the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations.  She is a recent graduate from the first cohort of students from the Schwarzman College at Tsinghua University in Beijing.  She first visited China when she was 18 months old and spent many years in grade school living in Nanjing and Taipei with her family. As an undergraduate at the George Washington University, she double majored in Chinese language and international affairs, with a concentration in security policy and the Asia region. Under the mentorship of David Shambaugh, Maggie developed a research method to analyze Chinese perspectives on non-traditional security issues such as terrorism, energy security, climate change, and public health concerns.

While at Schwarzman College, Maggie served on the leadership team that hosted the International Women’s Day conference at the college. She also helped facilitate a symposium with 25 Rhodes Scholars that aimed to deepen their understanding of China. Maggie has a deep commitment to learning about China and a determination to create opportunities for her peers to exchange ideas.

 

 

 

Apr
2
Mon
An Event with the Chinese Comic Artist, Li Xiaoguai @ Room 102, Stephen C. Hall, Georgia Tech Campus
Apr 2 @ 4:30 pm – 6:00 pm

Subversive Writing and Political Comics

An Event with the Chinese Comic Artist, Li Xiaoguai, an Icon of Chinese Internet Culture and Youth Culture

April 2, Monday, 4:30-6:00 pm

Room 102,  Stephen C. Hall (Street address:  225 Bobby Dodd Way, NW Atlanta, Georgia 30332)

Georgia Tech Campus

Plus: Full Chinese Dinner with 7 courses for Free!  RSVP requested:  http://goo.gl/forms/w3s1kQ62ajMUZnwH2

Flier:  Li Xiaoguai GT Event Flyer

 

Apr
13
Fri
Symposium on ASIA-USA Partnership Opportunities (SAUPO) @ Renaissance Atlanta Waverly Hotel & Convention Center
Apr 13 @ 8:00 am – 6:00 pm

The Symposium on ASIA-USA Partnership Opportunities (SAUPO), the largest Asia business conference in the USA, is organized by KSU Asian Studies Program. Register for $249 dollars online here: http://saupo.kennesaw.edu

Time: 8:00am-6:00pm, Friday April 13, 2018

Location: Grand Ballroom, Renaissance Atlanta Waverly Hotel & Convention Center, 2450 Galleria Pkwy, Atlanta GA 30339

Your registration will cover Food, Beverage, all SAUPO panels, networking sessions. If you are from a sponsor or a partner company, you do not need to register online. Please email us your name, Job title and Company/Organization asap, so that we can make badges for you.

For your convenience, you may book rooms at Renaissance Atlanta Waverly Hotel, 2018 SAUPO host hotel for the discounted rate at $184.00 USD per night: Book your group rate for Symposium on Asia-USA Partnership Opportunities (SAUPO). The deadline for booking with the discount prices is March 20, 2018.

https://tinyurl.com/y7f8mwpa

The purposes of SAUPO include information exchange, personal network building, global visibility, and investment in the USA. It is anticipated that over 400 business leaders, diplomats, non-profit activists, scholars, investors, and government officials from Asia, USA and other parts of the world will attend SAUPO in Atlanta.  There will be a delegation of Chinese investors coming, seeking for projects to invest.

2018 SAUPO-Atlanta Confirmed Speakers include:

o Ken Harmon, Interim President, Kennesaw State University

o John Merrill, Secretary of State, Alabama, USA

o Young-jun Kim, Consul General of Korea in Atlanta

o Yutaka Nakamura Deputy Consul General of Japan In Atlanta

o Zhencheng Zhou, Consul, Director of Commerce, Consulate General of China in Houston

o Mark Viken, VP of Marketing, Hisense

o Dan Forsman, President & CEO, Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices

o Michael Sullivan, Managing Partner, Womble Bond Dickinson

o Lucy Lu, Global Managing Partner, Lucy Lu & Associates

o Nagendra Roy, Senior Director -IT, Aptude, Inc.

o Donald Morrissey, Huawei Technologies USA, Inc.

o Martin Judge Jr., Chairman, China Arena Football League (CAFL)

o Glad Cheng, Chairman, China Window Group

o Jessica Cork, VP, Public Relations, YKK Corporation of America

o Frank Su, President, Kids’R’Kids China

o Wade Edwards, Int’l Marketing Director, Habitat for Humanity International

o Huandong Gao, Sr. Director of Growth, Walmart Headquarters

o Stephen Haverfield, Japan Exchange and Teaching (JET) Alumni Association

o Yoshi Domoto, Executive Director, Japan-America Society of Georgia

o Wendy Lu, Tax Senior Manager, Aprio

o Landon Van Dyke, Senior Advisor, U.S. Department of State

o Brendan Tate, U.S. Department of the Interior

o Brad Taylor, VP, The Coca-Cola Company

o Shiyu Wang, Chairman, Fargo Fortune Investment Group (China)

o Stan Shengqi Wang, Managing Partner, Tenfunder Investment Fund (China)

o Qixin Zhang, Chairman, Phoenix City Investment Fund; CPPCC Member (China)

o Michael Guo, Sr. Director of Software Engineering, LexisNexis

Future SAUPO Forecast:

Friday May 17, 2019 @ Shanghai, China

Friday April 17, 2020 @ Atlanta, USA

Friday May 14, 2021 @ Tokyo, Japan

Friday April 22, 2022 @ Atlanta, USA

SAUPO 2016 participants: http://saupo.kennesaw.edu/docs/2016-participants.pdf

2017 SAUPO video summary: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SCuLMmTvBxM

Apr
22
Sun
Understanding Xi Jinping Thought: Presented by Professor Stephen Herschler @ Teasley Auditorium - Agnes Scott College
Apr 22 @ 4:30 pm – 6:00 pm

The U.S.-China People’s Friendship Spring Forum

Presents:

Dr. Stephen Herschler
Interim Director; Center for Global Education,
Associate Professor of Political Science,
Oglethorpe University

​Dr. Stephen B. Herschler is an Associate Professor of Politics at Oglethorpe University. Dr. Herschler teaches Chinese Politics, Asian Politics, and Political Development. His research interests include Chinese local government, central-local relations, and contemporary economic ideologies. Dr. Herschler’s most recent project examines sub-national governments’ efforts to redress regional economic disparities. He has taught and conducted research in China and speaks Mandarin Chinese.

Dr. Herschler is an Associate and Board Member of the China Research Center.  See his most recent article in China Currents, https://www.chinacenter.net/2018/china_currents/17-1/exe-xi-sis-making-china-great/ 

This event is free and open to the public.

Aug
8
Wed
How Activism and the Media Can Thrive in China: A World Affairs Council Event @ Tower Place 200
Aug 8 @ 6:30 pm – 8:15 pm

How Activism and the Media Can Thrive in China

Throughout its checkered history, the Communist Party of the People’s Republic of China has a shown a distaste for dissent. Acting under the pretense of protecting China’s sovereignty, regulators have sanctioned journalists, censored social media platforms, and deployed the Great Firewall to control and monitor internet access across the entire country. Despite the censor’s best efforts, activism, free speech and opposition still thrive in the world’s largest economy. Learn from top experts on Chinese media, law and civil society how activism survives and occasionally even thrives in China. The discussion will also approach the current relationship between the White House and the media.
Featuring:

  • Maria Repnikova, Director, Center for Global Information Studies
  • Sida Liu, Fellow, The American Bar Foundation
  • Bin Xu, Assistant Professor of Sociology Emory University

By registering, I understand that photos and/or video will be taken at this program, and agree that these materials may be used for promotional purposes.  Please contact the programming team with questions: info@wacatlanta.org.

 Wednesday, August 8 at 6:30pm to 8:15pm

 Tower Place 200, Suite 800 3348 Peachtree Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30326

China Media 8 Aug 2018

Sep
14
Fri
“Regretless Youth and Long Live Youth!: Exhibits and Museums as Sites of Memory for China’s Zhiqing Generation,” Bin Xu, Assistant Professor, Sociology, Emory U. @ Emory University Modern Languages 201 Room
Sep 14 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Free and open to the public

As part of Bin Xu’s second book project, this talk examines how China’s zhiqing (“educated youth” or “sent-down youth”) generation comes to terms with their difficult past in “sites of memory,” such as exhibits and museums since the 1990s. Those sites of memory are where memory “crystallizes and secretes itself” (Pierre Nora), functioning as this generation’s defense mechanism to counter public forgetting and seek public recognition. Yet, the send-down program, in which the 17 million zhiqing were ordered to migrate to the countryside and frontiers when they were teenagers and stayed there for a long time, was politically controversial and socially detrimental. Thus, the beautiful wish of “long live youth” has always been tangled with regrets and grievances as well as pride and nostalgia. Every exhibit or museum walks a symbolic and political tightrope. Xu describes and explains how memory entrepreneurs and dynamics of cultural production fields result in a pattern of representation centered on “people but not the cause” and how such a pattern provokes even more public debates. This research aims to contribute to the literature on collective memory by examining generation as a collective identity reproduced in public genres of memory.

About the speaker
Bin Xu is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at Emory University. He received his Ph.D. in Sociology from Northwestern University. His first book (The Politics of Compassion: The Sichuan
Earthquake and Civic Engagement in China, Stanford University Press 2017) won the Mary Douglas Prize for Best Book in Sociology of Culture, the Sociology of Culture Section, American Sociological Association (2018), and the Best Book Prize on Asia/Transnational (Honorable Mention), Asia/Asian America Section, American Sociological Association (2018)
He is currently writing a book and a few related articles on the collective memory of China’s “educated youth” (zhiqing) generation—the 17 million Chinese youth sent down to the countryside in the 1960s and 1970s, drawing on the data collected in the last three years, including life history interviews, ethnography, and archival research, to address how members of this important generation interpret meanings of their past difficulties and sufferings in the countryside, how those interpretations are represented and expressed in autobiographic memories, cultural objects, and commemorative activities, and what their memories tell us about this generation’s mentality.
In addition to the book on the Sichuan earthquake, his articles have appeared in leading journals in sociology and China studies, such as Sociological Theory, Theory & Society, Social Problems, The China Quarterly, The China Journal, and so on. He has won awards from American Sociological Association/National Science Foundation and American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS). In 2016, he was selected as one of the 21 Public Intellectuals Program (PIP) fellows at the National Committee on US-China Relations, a prestigious program designed to nurture young China specialists to facilitate mutual understanding between the United States and China (https://www.ncuscr.org/pip ). He also was awarded the prestigious Henry Luce/ACLS Postdoctoral Fellowship in China Studies for the 2017-18 academic year (https://www.acls.org/research/fellow.aspx?cid=623a9a7d-8323-e711-9454-000c29879dd6).

Sep
24
Mon
Weddings in Shanghai: Dr. Davis, Yale University, CRC Annual Lecture @ White Hall, Rm 112, Emory University
Sep 24 @ 4:00 pm – 5:15 pm

Dr. Deborah Davis, Professor of Sociology, Yale University will present:

“Weddings in Shanghai: Performing Happiness and Re-Verticalizing Kinship”

Weddings in Shanghai are often lavish and involve multiple rituals
from early morning tea ceremonies to raucous toasting displays at
evening banquets. However, close observation of the ceremonies
and extended interviews with brides, grooms, and their parents
reveal much more than a competitive display of conspicuous
consumption. Rather close study of the multiple performances of
gratitude and devotion document both the enduring centrality of
filiality and newly intensified vertical ties of affection and
loyalty between parents and their adult only child.

Emory University, White Hall Room 112

4:00 pm, Monday, Sept. 24th, 2018

Sep. 24 Lecture.Davis

Note that Dr. Davis will give a second lecture at Georgia Tech on Sept. 25th, 4:00 pm.

Sep
25
Tue
Uneven Urbanization in China, Dr. Davis, Yale University: CRC Annual Lecture @ The Clary Theatre, Bill Moore Student Success Center, Georgia Tech
Sep 25 @ 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm

The 2018 CRC Annual Lecture

Dr. Deborah Davis, Yale University, presents: 

“Uneven Urbanization in China: Causes and Consequences”

 

Time: 4-5:30 pm, Tuesday, September 25 Venue: The Clary Theatre, Bill Moore Student Success Center, Georgia Tech

Visitor Parking: Georgia Tech North Avenue Visitor Parking Lots, http://www.pts.gatech.edu/visitors

Free & Open to the Public

Forty years ago, China was “under urbanized’; less than 20% of the population lived in towns or cites and that percentage had not shifted for many decades. Today the majority of Chinese citizens live and work in urban settlements and China has more than 160 cities with a population of over one million. Market forces have fueled rapid urbanization but equally decisive has been a radical extension of city boundaries. As a result, urban “spaces” have expanded twice as fast as the urban population. Moreover, while half of the new urbanites are migrants who left their villages to seek their fortune in the cities, half are in-situ urbanites where the “city came to them.”  In this lecture, Deborah Davis first summarizes the macro-level shifts between 1980 and 2015 and then draws on current research to discuss multiple dimensions of “uneven urbanization.”

Deborah Davis is Professor Emerita of Sociology at Yale University and a Distinguished Visiting Professor at Fudan University in Shanghai as well as on the faculty at the Schwarzman College at Tsinghua University.  At Yale she served as Director of Academic Programs at the Yale Center for the Study of Globalization, Chair of the Department of Sociology, Chair of the Council of East Asian Studies, and co-chair of the Women Faculty Forum. Her past publications have analyzed the politics of the Cultural Revolution, Chinese family life, social welfare policy, consumer culture, property rights, social stratification, occupational mobility, and impact of rapid urbanization and migration on health and happiness.

2018 Annual Lecture Flyer

 

 

 

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